What is the Average Salary in Japan by Age and Occupation?

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Japan has long been thought to provide very good salaries to it’s salary workers. But that’s not always the case. Sometimes, the salary is high but taxes and rent is just as high and sometimes, depending on your age and occupation, it might take a significant chunk out of your pocket or it might not affect you.

 

The Average Salary in Japan by age is: The average annual salary increases by age group, but there is a significant gender gap across age groups. The average annual salary for a person in their twenties is 3,540,000 Yen or $32,182. The average salary for a 20-something man is 3,740,000 Yen or $34,000, while the average salary for a 20-something woman is ¥500,000 less, at 3,240,000 Yen or $29,455.

 

By industry, the Average Salary in Japan is:

 

A survey conducted by DODA also revealed the industries with the highest average salaries. The top 6 industries in the list below had average salaries higher than the average overall salary 4,420,000 Yen: medical, finance, manufacturing, IT/communications, general trading, and construction/real estate.

 

What jobs have the highest average salaries?

 

86 different job classifications were included in the DODA survey in Japan. The following is the Top 30 ranking:

 

In recent years, what has become of the Average Salary in Japan?

 

Interestingly, the annual average salary reported by workers in the 2016 survey represented a 0.5% increase compared to 2015, but that salaries reported in this survey did not recovered to the levels reported in 2008, the year of the Global Financial Crisis.

 

Japan is known for being one of the most expensive cities in the world to live in and a Japanese person told me that they had a salary of 500,000 Yen but the rent and taxes totaled 350,000 Yen.

 

Reference: WHAT IS THE AVERAGE SALARY IN JAPAN BY OCCUPATION AND AGE?

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