Tokyo eyes basically banning indoor smoking at restaurants, hotels

The Tokyo metropolitan government plans to ban indoor smoking in facilities in preparation for the 2020 Tokyo Olympics and Paralympics. A corresponding punishment may take place once the rule is broken.

 

Photo credit to: https://www.japantimes.co.jp

 

Tokyo governor Yuriko Koike said in a press conference last September 8, 2017 that “total indoor smoking ban is the basic trend of host cities of the Olympics.” She outlined the following:

 

  • No smoking inside restaurants, hotels, department stores and airports. In consideration of those who smoke, smoking rooms may be set up,
  • Smoking will also be prohibited not just inside the buildings of medical institutions and schools but on the whole compound due to children and patients as main users of these facilities,
  • Government offices and universities are also included. Smoking rooms should not be set up inside these buildings,
  • Small bars may be exempted under certain conditions. With a floor area of less than 30 square meters, smoking may be allowed given that all employees agree with it. The bars also should not allow the entry of minors, and
  • A fine of up to 50,000 yen ($460) on smokers will be imposed if smokers or establishments violate the said ordinance.

 

The Tokyo government will solicit public opinion regarding the matter until October 6 this year. After which it will be proposed to the Tokyo Metropolitan Assembly by the end of March 2018. The Tokyo government wants to enact the ordinance before the Rugby World Cup in 2019 which Japan will host.

 

On a national level, the health ministry is also looking at revising the law to ban indoor smoking at public buildings. According to World Health Organization, Japan is one of the countries that have poor tobacco control policies.

 

Reference: Tokyo eyes basically banning indoor smoking at restaurants, hotels

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