The North Korean dynasty and the people’s votes

North Korea, as we know, is more or less an absolute monarchy. And as such, it has only one ruler who makes all the laws. And therefore, it should come as a surprise that elections are held every 5 years. But there’s usually only one person to vote and that’s the Kim dynasty.

 

Every half decade, the populace is called to vote for someone they think would be the best leader of the country but unfortunately, if anyone campaigns against the Kim dynasty, they will automatically get sent to prison camps.

 

Photo credit to: https://www.washingtonpost.com

And when you enter those camps, especially the maximum security prisons, it’s literally impossible to get out. I was told back in the early 2010’s that someone did campaign against the current leadership but he subsequently disappeared and was never seen of and heard from again.

 

Such is the case with North Korea. So to have an election now, and with the easing of tensions between their southern neighbours, the current North Korean election is a welcome change. Or is it?

 

Yes, just about everyone in NoKor appeared in polling stations (or else they’d be branded as traitors and killed or sent to prison) and they obviously voted. However, my sources tell me that there is still no electoral competition and so, for all intents and purposes, the Kim dynasty still reigns supreme over all.

 

And those who challenge the regime will meet a most untimely and unfavourable end.

 

And the thing about it is that the elections are all rigged. There is only one person to vote for and only one favour to choose from: an approval.

 

It’s basically like this: you see the ballot, you see only one name (Kim Jong Un) and only see one option of favour: approval. To not sign either or both means you are a traitor.

 

Reference: North Koreans head to polls to approve new parliament lineup

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