How Much Can You Save A Month If You Worked In Japan?

photo credit to: http://japaneseruleof7.com

A single, young working person in Tokyo actually can save some green paper per month. Of course, the question of how much you can save depends primarily on your expenses and how much you make.

 

A Japanese real estate website found that the average single person living by themselves in greater Tokyo had the following average monthly expenses that totaled to 126,000 Japanese Yen.

 

The website averages were lower for people in their twenties, but we are only summarizing the overall numbers so we can get a ballpark figure. Expenses vary from individual to individual and may be more expensive for women such as buying hygienic and sanitary products.

 

Another factor is that your employer will make mandatory deductions for social security, unemployment insurance, pension, and health insurance. You will also have to pay income tax.

 

You will also have to start paying local inhabitant tax which will add about ¥13,500 to your tax bill when you’ve stayed in Japan for two years, so your net pay will be about ¥197,000.

 

A survey of young people living in the greater Tokyo region and are tallied from valid responses received from 125 men and 125 women between the ages of 20 and 39 who live by themselves in rental housing.

 

People earning less than ¥2,500,000 a year were observed to have among the lowest average savings rate but still surprisingly managed to save between 5-8% of their gross annual salary.

 

For the overall surveyed group, 40% answered that they had saved less than 1 million yen in two years. The next most frequent answer was between 1 million and 2 million yen.

 

About 28.2% of this group had savings of less than 1 million yen a year; 25.6% of this group had savings of between 1 million and less than 2 million a year.

 

Reference: HOW MUCH CAN A SINGLE WORKING PERSON IN TOKYO SAVE A MONTH?

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