Here’s why Japanese kids aren’t studying abroad

There have been reports, by the Japanese authorities, that their younger generation, AKA their kids, aren’t studying as much abroad as they once used to. And the majority of the population are more or less evenly split, for and against this recent trend.

 

To give you a perspective of this, let’s go back to 2004, a time when Japanese kids going abroad to learn was at it’s peak. Figures at that time were as high as 90,000 kids going abroad to study… Whatever it is the study.

 

Photo credit to: https://www.abbynews.com

Fast forward to 2011 and that number has dropped to 57,501. That’s approximately 33% fall from 7 years before and our agency has been told that they’re only declining more and more as the years go by.

 

Some analysts say (or claim) that it’s due to the collapse of the economic bubble repeating itself. This is in reference to the aptly named Lost Decade, a period of economic loss for a full ten years which started in 1991 or 1992.

 

Some analysts say that it’s many factors not just the collapse of the economic bubble. As such, they say that it’s simply down to personal and individual interests of students. Also, another factor is a high increase in tuition fees in different countries. In the US of A, tuitions used to cost about 1 to 2 million Yen but now, it’s gone up to 5 or 6 million Yen.

 

Job hunting has also been ruled in because, let’s face it, jobs in each country are mostly reserved for locals and the US is currently hiring locals to work in their factories and sending foreign workers home for the most part.

 

And lastly, a language barrier, previously thought of as conquered, has reared it’s ugly head once again as students aren’t learning English as much as they used to. Our agency was quite surprised at this but it’s a possibility.

 

Reference: Why Are Fewer Young Japanese Studying Abroad?

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