Future Looks Bright for Foreign Workers, Disabled in Japan

Japanese companies are opening their doors to more foreign workers, women, elderly people, and disabled people in response to various economic occurrences such as overseas expansion, chronic labor shortage and legal change on the employment of the disabled. These have prompted job fairs to be organized in turn.

 

The companies are going ahead of the revised employment law set to take effect next April which will require them to hire people with mental and physical disabilities.

 

Photo credit to: http://news.abs-cbn.com

 

In conjunction and response to this, NODE Inc., a manpower agency targets foreign students in Japan, mainly from the country members of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations. It recently held a seminar in Tokyo last mid-September. Seven Japanese companies including nursing care and real estate businesses were present, and about 30 foreign students from the ASEAN countries such as Vietnam and Thailand joined the fair. The participating companies were briefed on the advantages of hiring foreigners and how to obtain work permits for these prospective employees. Students on the other hand were given advice on job interviews.

 

NODE has organized 10 job-matching seminars since its launch in 2014. It has invited students from Brunei, Cambodia, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, Philippines, Singapore, Thailand and Vietnam. A NODE official said that they have been receiving increased inquiries from companies looking for work-ready manpower year after year.

 

Recruit Staffing Co. also arranged interview sessions last mid-September for the recruitment of disabled people. It brought together 20 companies and 40 job seekers in their 20s-40s in Tokyo. “Meeting directly with applicants, we can learn about their personalities and characteristics in person — which we cannot find in background papers,” Keisuke Tokoyo, president of IT firm Takes Co said of the interview session.

 

Reference: More Japanese firms eager to recruit foreigners, disabled

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